After phase 2, the seals go to phase 3. Here, the seals are almost completely recovered. They only need to regain a little more strength before they can be released.

WHY IS THERE SO MUCH FISH IN THE POOL?

All of the seals in this enclosure can eat by themselves. Twice daily, a large amount of fish is thrown into the pool. The seals usually don’t eat everything in one go, which is why you often see fish laying on the bottom.

 

DO THE SEALS SWIM IN SEA WATER?

The water in these pools is basically tap water with a bit of salt mixed into it, as the seals don’t necessarily need the extremely high salt content in sea water. The large pools are emptied out every week and cleaned. The water doesn’t go into the sewer but is pumped through our filtration system. This way, we waste as little water as possible.

 

WHAT IS THE LITTLE CRANE FOR?

On the day of their release, the seals are loaded into heavy wooden boxes. The seal and box combined are quite heavy! The crane is used to hoist the seals out of the pools so our staff members' backs are spared.

 

THE BANANA POSE

Is a seal lying in this pose? That’s a good sign! Only healthy seals can keep their bodies in this position for an extended period of time. Why do they do this? Seals keep their body warm with a thick layer of blubber, which is absent from the flippers and the head. In order to keep their flippers and head warm and dry, they keep these body parts off the ground.

Zeehond in de bananenhouding in fase 3 van de zeehondenopvang in Zeehondencentrum Pieterburen

WHEN WILL THE SEALS BE RELEASED?

The nurses and veterinarians weigh these seals every week. They also use that opportunity to check the overall health of the animals. Their release date is planned when the seals are completely free of medication, wounds or illnesses and maintain a healthy weight.